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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  February 24, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

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this is bbc america. now, live from london, "bbc world news." hello, i'm aaron heslehurst with "bbc world news." recommend the controversial kata world cup should be moved from summer to winter. will the greem reform plan be enough to satisfy creditors? could britain have done more to stop three teenagers from flying to islamic state?
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hello, everybody. well the 2022 world cup in qatar should take place in november and december it's what fifa recommended. now the change could set on a collision course with european leagues who oppose the plan. the head of the football organization after the announcement. >> i think the recommendation for november/december. again, there's an option. some people have concerns. whatever the decision, i think people will have something about it. it's an overall benefit for everybody. >> our correspondent gave us an
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update. >> reporter: they have the agreement of the football confederation. the big clubs, the big leagues, we have yet to hear from them. they are unhappy about the switch given the disruption it will cause to their domestic schedule. they will determine if it has to be moved because of the summer heat in qatar. they want to bring it to new parts of the world to expand the world cup and take the place where it's never been before. to do that they feel it has to be compromised. one is late november late december world cup is what they want to see. it will go to the executive committee in zurich next month. >> it's good to see you. this is surely a huge implication for football teams around the world. >> that's what they were saying. it they are going to see a lot
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the 19th and 20th. we expect them to ratify the world cup will take place in november and december. it's a minefield implicating a host of parties. mainly the european leagues, the big leagues. their season will have to be rescheduled, drastically, to accommodate a win. 75% around that figure of the last world cup in brazil. that's a look at how to restructure their leagues so the world cup has a minimum impact. >> rescheduling -- it's huge. >> they have already said it's thrown out an olive branch saying a shortened world cup. we expect a match of days not weeks. it will get rid of the league during the months of november and december. they will get rid of those. there will be a little bit of give and they will have to extend their leagues as well.
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they have never had a winter break before. this would be the first time it's happened. they could say we'll go ahead regardless. we'll go ahead without the players. that's very unlikely. that will probably have to have a break. at that meeting in qatar said he was disappointed. their reason they agreed to host it in the summer they won the bid based on that, now it's the winter. they should not have to clean up the mess fifa created. you have to go with it. you have no sports. they said they go along with the fact the world cup will take place in november and december. >> march 19 and 20 is when they expect to get the recommendation. >> thanks very much. greece has been in the
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headlines again. they submitted their reforms to the international creditor for the four-month long extension. they want to get rid of the austerity. it can raise billions of euros in revenue by combatting tax evasion, corruption and tobacco smuggling. the head of the group says the ecb, the imf, international monetary fund is going to see if it's a valid starting point. >> hopefully the progress we'll make today and the national parliaments over the course of the week will also be contribute to restoring trust between all parties and help to get the recovery of greece back on track. >> okay. we are in athens and have a closer look at greece. >> reporter: the emphasis on this is to tackle humanitarian
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crisis, which are costly to some. for example, they said they will provide free health care to those who are unemployed and lost their health insurance. they will reconnect electricity to those whose power is cut off. that will cost 810 million euros. to fund that the government promised to fight tax evasion. they believe that will give them the revenues to increase social spending. the creditors have insisted on things like increases and pension cuts. the question is whether there's going to be disagreement between the two sides over the cuts to the public sector. are germany and other governments going to insist athens abide by the commitment for cuts in the sector or trust
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the greek government with tax evasion and smuggling. they can raise the necessary revenue and increase it for social spending. we'll know this afternoon when the finance ministers are on a conference call. the islamic state militants are said to have abducted at least 90 people from christian villages in syria. the kidnappings took place after the militants seized the villages from kurdish forces. let's get more on this. lena joins us. good to see you. what's the latest on another set of abductions. >> it's a worrying situation. recently what happened in libya there is high concern on the livelihood of these 90 christians. this is a minority group in
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northern syria and other parts of syria as well. they are now in the hands of isis. of course we can tell that isis is losing in many parts because the forces are supported by the international community, the coalition sighting. there's great concern unless a deal takes place, there's great concern for the lives of these people. >> the kurdish, with intense fighting. does it say anything about what could happen under the nose of kurdish fighters? >> we know very well they are trying to fight isis and they have pushed them from many parts, includinge kubany. but, there are concerns that isis wants to take revenge. that's why they are controlling this area and abducting the
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christian minorities. they know this will make more for them. they are going to pay close attention given the minority. we know what's going to happen when they were abducted as well. >> given what we saw with the egyptians, it doesn't bode well. i mean what are the chances of finding and freeing? >> it's all happening behind closed doors and what's happening in negotiations. you know they went into northern syria to take them. they may be able to play a role in trying to negotiate the release of these abducted people. even in the past i.s. abducted around 90 or 70 kurdish teenagers and released them some time after. there are ways that sometimes
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i.s. would release, you know abducted people. there is something they want. you have to wait and see, what do they want this time. >> thanks lina joining me there. stay with us on "bbc world news." still to come -- >> cuba celebrates the cigar with relations with america. the tobacco country is looking toward the future. poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. how do i get hotel deals nobody else gets?... i know a guy. price-line ne-go-ti-a-tor! i know this guy...
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this is, of course "bbc world news." i'm aaron heslehurst. the world cup to be moved from summer to winter. islamic militants have captured dozens of christians in northeast syria. well the russian president vladimir putin, diskissed an all
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out war with ukraine. he expressed support for the recent cease-fire deal to stabilize eastern ukraine. both sides start pulling back the heavy artillery of the terms of the agreement. we have the report. >> reporter: this is a town with the remains of an intended cease-fire now burn. the agreement, a week old cease-fire deal intended to end the fighting was ignored by rebels here as they fought on and captured this town last week. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: there will be no peace. this is my personal opinion. i wouldn't want peace. right there in kiev in the white house, in their parliament the suffering they brought to this land civilians and all people.
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>> reporter: in this first interview since the agreement was broken russian president, vladimir putin, was asked if a war with ukraine was possible. >> translator: i think such a scenario is unlikely. i hope this will never happen. the agreements have not only been worked out by the four countries, ukraine, russia france and germany, they have been fixed in the united nation security council and took a statute supported by the whole of international society. it's already a completely different story. i hope this will be fulfilled. if it is fulfilled, this is the right part toward globalization in this area of the country. >> reporter: the common ground from the ukraine military to destabilize the situation
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further. accused prorussian rebels of firing rockets and artillery at villages in southeastern ukraine. they will not pull back heavy weapons until the shelling stops. for the handful of locals that have not fled the area and chosen to remain here they watch as their lives crumble. this woman says we don't work anywhere because there's nothing to eat. we need humanitarian aid to live on. the food and work are drying up here. a cease-fire is what these people want but for many the agreement is as unstable as ever. lucas, bbc news. >> well turkey criticized authorities for taking three days to alert them about three british schoolgirls believed to
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have traveled to syria and izus stan boll. police officers are searching for the girls. >> reporter: the prime minister made a statement yesterday about the situation of the three youngsters. he complained that they weren't informed about the three girls until friday which is like three days after they fly to istanbol. it would be great if we can find them, if not, britain is to blame, not turkey. he said as well turkey can do little to track the where abouts of these three girls because they entered the country as tourists. i have spoken to a security source yesterday. he said well people come here as tourists and you can't really
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stop everyone on the street blaming them of maybe their intent to cross to syria. so the search is still ongoing. turkish officials and local security sources are blaming britain for not sharing enough intelligence with them and saying they can't do more. we traveled the other day to see for ourselves what the situation was like at the border gate. there was no security on the way. they could have made easily their way toward the border gate, but we don't know if they have crossed to syria or are still in turkey. >> the metropolitan police reacted to claims they were too late. the statement is being released saying once we established the girls traveled to turkey police made contact with the liaison
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officer. since then we have been working with the tur kish authorities providing assistance to the investigation. paris police say they have ordered at least five drones flying over the french capitol overnight. an investigation is under way into who is flying them and why. france is seeing dozens of mystery drones flying over nuclear plants. one flew over the presidential palace. lucy is in paris and joins us. lucy, good to see you. as i mentioned, the latest in a series of drones over i guess sensitive locations in france. i guess it must be concerning given the recent attacks in the city. >> reporter: well there's certainly a lot more security around paris these days. you see them around the streets
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and key sites. people are in a state of heightened awareness, that is true. the drone flights have been going on four months. they are something of a mystery. to a degree, people got used to them, they have gotten used to seeing them over nuclear sites, some military installations. what happened last night changed the picture a bit. this was a series of drones five of them spotted over key sites on the capitol. tourist sites and the u.s. embassy. the first one spotted over the u.s. embassy around midnight. police followed it to the museum, lost site of it then later on four more drones over the eiffel tower and they flew over tourist sites, really. before that police say they couldn't find the operator. they have no idea who was flying them whether they were
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coordinated or what the motive was. >> lucy joining us live in paris. now to liberia. ebola has dropped to one tenth of when it was at its peak. the country still has the problem of what to do with infectious waist. >> reporter: liberia got the known ebola cases down to a handful. that doesn't mean the country's problems are over. here is one that most people didn't give a thought to when the priority was saving lives. what to do with the huge quantities of potentially infectious human waste carely stored at ebola treatment centers. what to do with many gallons of ebola poo. runs have started. trucks full of the stuff will be
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taken from the treatment centers to a permanent holding point. it's like the biological equivalent to nuclear waste will be driven through town. the trucks will not be allowed to stop. safety teams will be on stand by. centralizing the poo at this sewage works is only part of the solution. workers will have to be trained in how to handle and store it. the instructors say the teams are doing well. >> they are doing pretty fine. they are cooperating. 90% of it. >> reporter: experts believe the ebola virus becomes harmless soon after it leaves the human body. taking any chances would be foolish. the truth is there's never been an epidemic of the disease on this scale and never been so much dangerous human fluid to
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get rid of. the community is keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> we are here for the people. whatever we see, not in line with the protocol we are there to raise a red flag. >> reporter: for all the safety measures in place, this is still unknown territory. you don't have to be a civil engineer to see this holding tank has maintenance issues. on the other side of a simple fence, small holders live and plant food crops. this community and the ebola poo will have to be monitored for some time to be sure the danger is gone for sure. bbc news liberia. >> let's take a look at other news making headlines. the australian prime minister tony abbott -- his comments
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highlight the widespread sexual assaults among child detainees in the system. he said it is a political stitch up. black rats have been blamed for the spread of spread. mice are linked to the warm and wet weather in asia. the population of gerbils. now, a story we brought you yesterday. the chair of an influential parliamentary stepped down after he paid a chinese company. he denied wrong doing, but the work of the committee should not be distracted by the current controversy. he said he will not be standing as a member of parliament at the
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next general election. okay cigars from around 80 countries. they have gathered in the cuban capitol for the annual cigar festival. it's among rules of the mission to buy up to $100 of cigars previously banned. we have the report. >> reporter: every year, the havana festival is the highlight. tobacco connoisseurs and industry insiders from around the world gather in cuba for some of the most iconic exports. whether visitors are here just to make contacts humidors. this is a premier trade event. this year there is a key difference. americans, previously banned
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from bringing cuban cigars back to the united states under the trade embargo are able to carry up to $100 worth in their luggage. >> this is the first time we have been able to purchase legally. legally purchase. some of us have purchased on the underground. for us this is the first time we can do it. we are very happy. >> reporter: the company behind cuban cigar brands is a joint. something they say would be a major boost to the company's tobacco industry. >> translator: our future market shares reach in the united states is 70%. it is clear that we will reach this in the long term. >> improved cigar sales are important to cuba it takes place on friday when the obama administration holds a second
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round of talks with cuba in washington. >> you can get more news all the news on the bbc website. coming up shortly, we'll have more news. see you shortly, bye. (vo) after 50 years of designing cars for crash survival, subaru has developed our most revolutionary feature yet. a car that can see trouble... ...and stop itself to avoid it. when the insurance institute for highway safety tested front crash prevention nobody beat subaru models with eyesight. not honda. not ford or any other brand. subaru eyesight. an extra set of eyes, every time you drive.
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hello, i'm with "bbc world news." our top stories, world cup in the winter is the recommendation by the fifa task force for qatar 2022. islamic state militants kidnap dozens of christians according to local activists. greece delivers their economic reform plan to brussels. is it enough to satisfy them? unmanned minidrones spotted across paris. is it spying or just a toy?
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welcome to "bbc world news." the 2022 world cup in qatar should take place in november and december it's what fifa recommended in the last couple hours with the move expected to be approved next month. it could set them on a collision course with european leagues. the head of the football confederation spoke to reporters after the announcement. >> i think the recommendation toward november/december. again, there's an option. some people have concerns. whatever the decision, i think people will have something about it. it's an overall benefit for everybody.
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>> our correspondent in qatar gave us an update. >> reporter: it won't please even. they have the agreement of the football confederation. the big clubs, the big leagues, are unhappy about the switch given the disruption it will cause to their domestic schedule. fifa determined it will have to be moved because of the heat in summer in qatar. they want to bring it to new parts of the world to expand the world cup and take the place where it's never been before. to do that, they feel it has to be compromised. one is late november, late december world cup is what they want to see. it will go to the executive committee for ratification in zurich next month. we have breaking news from nigeria.
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reporters say a suicide bomber blew himself up in an 18-seat bus in northeastern nigeria. at least 18 people have been killed including the bomber. we'll have more details when we get them. let's go to syria now. islamic state militants are said to have abducted at least 90 people from christian villages in northeastern village in syria. they say the kidnappings took place after they ceased the villages from kurdish forces during dawn raids. earlier, our middle east editor alan johnson gave us an update on the kidnappings in syria. >> reporter: these reports coming to us from the syrian observatory, organizations in britain are drawing on the force from across syria. this morning, there have been
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disturbing developments in the country. they believe islamic state militants struck in the early hours, dawn raids in the christian community out there in the countryside. intercepts of radio traffic between one group of militants and the other suggested that 56 crusaders, as the term used have been abducted. later, more christians taken in another area. we believe there may be 90 people having been abducted. >> alan johnson there. let's go to the rest of the news. the australian prime minister tony abbott launched an attack on the human rights commission following the publication of why sexual assault harms child detainees. he says the inquiry has been a
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political stitch up. the british house of law allows -- the first country in the world to practice this method of conception. they voted to legalize the practice earlier this month. black rats have always been blamed for spreading the plague. now scientists say gerbils may have been responsible. those are conditions in which the population of gerbils and the fleas living in them. let's go to greece now. the country submitted a list of reforms to the international to try to secure a four-month loan extension. the greek government wants to get rid of austerity measures
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under the bailout program. it can raise billions of euros. earlier, our correspondent gave us a look. >> reporter: it's meant to tackle hughtarian crisis. for example, they said they will provide free health care to those who are unemployed and lost their health insurance. they will reconnect electricity to people whose power has been cut off. it will cost about 810 million euros. so in order to fund that the government promised to fight tax evasion and go after those that got away with tax evasion for far too long. they believe that will give the revenue to increase social spending. the creditors insisted on things
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like pension cuts. the question now is whether the disagreement between the two sides over the cuts to the public sector. are germany and other governments going to make them abide by the cuts or trust the commitments of the greece government. they can raise the revenue to fill the funding gab this year and increase the revenue for the social spending. we will know when they give their verdict on a conference call. >> mark loewen reporting there. bbc reports, the country has the problem of what to do with huge quantities of potentially infectious human waste. >> reporter: liberia may have successfully got the number of known ebola cases down to a handful.
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that doesn't mean the country's problems are over. here is one that most people didn't give a thought to when the priority was saving lives. what to do with the quantities of potentially infectious human waste carefully stored at ebola treatment centers. what to do with many gallons of ebola poo. runs have started. trucks full of the stuff will be taken from the treatment centers to a permanent holding point. it's like the biological equivalent to nuclear waste will be driven through town. the trucks will not be allowed to stop. safety teams will be on stand by. however, centralize zing the poo at this sewage works is only part of the solution. municipal workers will have to be trained in how to handle and store it.
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the instructors say the teams are doing well. >> they are doing pretty fine. they are cooperating. they are understanding. 90% of it. >> reporter: experts believe the ebola virus becomes harmless soon after it leaves the human body. taking any chances would be foolish. the truth is, there's never been an epidemic of the disease on this scale and never been so much dangerous human fluid to get rid of. the community living around the sewage works is keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> we are here for the people. whatever we see, not in line with the protocol, we are there to raise a red flag. they are on course. >> reporter: for all the safety measures in place, this is still unknown territory. you don't have to be a civil engineer to see this holding tank has maintenance issues. on the other side of a simple
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fence, small holders live and plant food crops. this community and the ebola poo will have to be monitored for some time to be sure the danger is gone for sure. bbc news, liberia. the russian president, vladimir putin dismissed any likelihood of an all-out war with ukraine. speaking on russian television he stressed support for the recent cease-fire deal as the best way to stabilize eastern ukraine. it's still not clear when both sides will pull back the heavy artillery. we have the report. >> reporter: this is a town where the remains of an intended cease-fire now burn. the agreement, a week old cease-fire deal intended to end the fighting was ignored by rebels here as they fought on
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and captured this town last week. >> translator: there will be no peace. this is my personal opinion. i wouldn't want peace. i would like to handle this in kiev, in the white house, in their parliament for the suffering they brought to this land, to the civilians and all the people. >> reporter: in his first interview since the agreement was broken russian president, vladimir putin, was asked if a war with ukraine was possible. >> translator: well, i think such a scenario is unlikely i hope this will never happen. the agreements have not only been worked out by the four countries, ukraine, russia france and germany, they have been fixed in the resolution of the ewe nated nations security council and took the international statute supported
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practically by the whole of international society. it's already a completely different story and i really hope this will be fulfilled. if it is fulfilled, then this is the right path toward nar mallization in this part of the country. >> reporter: back on the ground claims from the military to stabilize the situation further. accused pro-russian rebels of firing at villages in southeastern ukraine. they say they will not pull back heavy weapons from the conflict zone until the shelling starts. for the handful of locals who have not fled the area they watch as their lives crumble. this woman says we don't work anywhere because there's nothing to eat and so we need humanitarian aid to live on.
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the food and work are drying up here. a cease-fire is what these people want but for many the agreement is as unstable as ever. lucas dionne, bbc news. police say they spotted at least five drones flying over the french capitol overnight. an investigation is under way into who was flying them and why. in recent months france has seen mystery zones over nuclear plants and military installations. lucy says this comes at a time of high security in paris. >> reporter: certainly more security around paris. you see them around the streets and key sights. people are in a state of heightened awareness, that's true. the drone flights have been going on for about four months. they are something of a mystery. to a degree people got used to them. they got used to seeing or hearing them reported over
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nuclear sites, mainly some military installation. what happened last night changed the picture. this was a series of drones spotted over key sites in the capitol, not nuclear or military sites, but tourist sites. the first over the u.s. embassy. police followed it to museums, lost sight of it there and later on, four more drones were seen over the eiffel tower and they flew over a couple other tourist sites, really the key sites in the center of paris. police couldn't find the operators. they have no idea who was flying them whether they were coordinated or what the motive was. >> lucy williamson from paris. stay with us on bbc. still to come these commuters in south korea will find out why sinkholes occur.
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this is "bbc world news." i have the latest headlines. they have recommended the 2022 world cup in qatar be moved from summer to winter. they recommended the 2022 world cup be moved to winter. we have breaking news for you now. the head of the united nations panel of scientists have resigned. a leading authority on climate change faces allegations of sexual harassment in his home country of india. he denies wrong doing.
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roger, update us on what happened in the allegations. >> the doctor has two jobs one is head of the intergovernmental panel on climate change the u.n. panel that advised on what to do about it and the other is head of energy resources institute in delhi. he has been sending a 29-year-old inappropriate texts and messages on the computer. these are allegations he denies. according to some reports, his lawyer is suggesting that somebody may have gotten into his computer and his phone and hacked them in a way and the messages are in some way bogus. he has now resigned. he was due to chair a meeting about the future of the panel on climate change. we heard he wouldn't be attending that meeting to attend to issues in india.
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now we have heard what the issues are and he's pulled out. >> he's very high profile. the allegations are serious. what does this leave the future or progress of climate change? >> i think, from the point of view of the panel, people in there will regard it as a blessing he has quickly stepped aside. early on in his career there were demands for him to resign over a different issue. not in terms of proprietary, but judgment. he fought a long battle to stay. he's had a lot of criticism from skeptics to attacked him. he's developed a very thick skin over the years. he's due to retire right now. this election procedure is under way to find a successor for him. he stepped aside to save embarrassment or somebody in the organization said it may be best if you leave now to leave us
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with a clean record to the end of the process. >> no doubt we will follow the story and developments. roger, thanks very much. turkey has criticized british authorities for taking three days to alert them about three british schoolgirls believed to travel through syria through istanbul. we are on the turkish/syria border and says police officers are searching for the girls. >> reporter: the prime minister made a statement yesterday about the situation of the three youngsters. he complained that they weren't informed about these three girls till friday which is like three days after they took the flight to istanbul. he said the search is ongoing for the three girls. it would be great if we can find them. if we can't, it is britain to blame, not turkey. he said as well turkey can do very little to track the where
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abouts of the three girls because they entered the country as tourists. i have spoken to a security source here yesterday and he said people come here as tourists and you can't really stop everyone on the streets blaming them of maybe their intent to cross to syria. so the search is still ongoing. turkish officials are blaming britain for not sharing enough intelligence with them and saying they can't do more. we traveled to a border crossing yesterday, the other day, to see for ourselves what the situation was like at the border gate. there was no security on the way. they could have made easily their way toward the bodier gate but we don't know if they have made to cross syria or if they are still in turkey.
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>> the police have reacted to claims they were too late in informing turkish authorities. once we established the girls traveled to turkey they made -- since then we have been working closely with the turkish authorities who are providing great assistance and support to the investigation. the east of the mediterranean has been associated with energy resources until recently when seismic survey suggests israel cypress and lebanon have large reserves of oil and gas. they have been moving to capitolize on this lebanon has been lagging behind. we have the report from beirut. >> reporter: in these waters there is a bigger catch than
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fish. what lies beneath are oil and gas reserves divided between cypress, israel and lebanon. probably what initially attracted large companies such as the french total and the american chevron. they quickly discovered they were approaching troubled waters. this beach in beirut is half way along the lebanese coastline across 225 kilometers from south to north. the area up the coast, deep into the sea, is likely to be divided into gas and oil block. the final decision on how to divide the blocks and the terms of their expiration by the company is in political squabbles. this has created endless delays and made companies reluctant to
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take the plunge. in the meantime israel started producing gas ashore. cypress is also making headway. officials here insist lebanon has not lost the battle yet. >> lebanon has completed the seismic survey of the entire excluded economic zone and that will save us lots of time on the expiration and will bring us to the production. >> reporter: two years ago, there was euphoria in lebanon over what the oil would bring to this country. on the streets, they promised better quality of life. for the moment that promise seems to be drifting further and further away.
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bbc news beirut. >> if you want to check how global oil prices compare to the price of petrol in your country, we have a full price calculator online. it will tell you how much more or less you pay for a tank to fill up at bbc.com/news. let's have a look at some amazing pictures now from south korea where the ground literally collapsed beneath the feet of these two pedestrians in seoul. that looks frightening. they were swallowed up as the pavement gave way and had to be rescued. you will be glad to hear they survived. it is not clear what caused the ground to collapse. the role of a nearby construction site is being investigated. the phenomenon known as sinkholes and while they are not that common, they are always spectacular.
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we have put together a brief history of the holes in the ground to take a look. ♪ ♪ ♪
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incredible. well, that's it for this edition of bbc news. follow me on twitter for more updates. good-bye for now. ers who seek more than just a little time off. the ones who choose to go big or stay home. ♪ come with me now ♪ where every amazing, despicable wizarding adventure reveals moments that are truly epic. this place is made for those who do more than just vacation ... ♪ whoa ♪ ♪ go with me now ♪ it's made for those who vacation like they mean it. universal orlando resort.
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